Letters to the Editor -- February 26, 2009

Published on Thu, Feb 26, 2009
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Letters to the Editor

The Editor:
I just want to thank the Whatcom Medic One crews we have here in Blaine. I don’t think we can ever say thank you enough to these great people.
I had to call them this week and was transported to St. Joseph for a semi-emergency. They are kind, professional and very sensitive to a patient’s and family needs.
One gentleman in particular, whose name I don’t know, was especially great for me. This may sound like nothing, but he started an IV on me the first try. This is a great feat! I have no veins. 
I am once again home, feeling much better and just wanted all of us to realize how lucky we are to have these great people.
Sherry Shawe
Blaine

The Editor and to all Parents, Grandparents, Aunts, Uncles, Sisters, and Brothers of this state. 
Please help stop allowing the education budget cutting! It’s going to ruin our children’s future! Many people feel strongly about this and it is time that I finally step up and stop being another face in the crowd!
People like us are afraid that with education funding cuts that are being made, our children are going to end up with the education of a third world country. (Some education is better than none, but an excellent education ensures our future!) I always thought that our state was often recognized and praised for our commitment to the best education. 
Every time our so-called governor makes another budget cut, essential school programs are left to fend for themselves. And with the state of the economy these days, the community’s support and contributions aren’t going to be enough to keep music and arts programs, after school study group classes and even certain sports programs alive.
Some people hope for getting a scholarship through those activities to be able to go to college. And what happens if those programs are no longer available? 
Our kids are our future … the future in medicine, technology, maybe even the next Albert Einstein. One of our children’s minds could hold the cure for cancer, AIDS or even world hunger.
We are the only ones who can change Gregoire’s foolish ways! Speak up, be heard! Don’t let the governor set our children up for failure. If we don’t stop this now, the damage will be done and it might not be reversible! 
One of my high school teachers told me something that has stuck with me over the years. “The loudest voice in the crowd will eventually be heard!” Gregoire is one person and we are many … stand up and stop hurting our children’s chances! A very concerned parent.
Tori Tollison
Blaine

The Editor:
It is impossible to thank individually all of the people who have contacted us with thoughts of sympathy. The sudden loss of two year-old Kori Beth was very hard on our family. But knowing that there are many who care for us helped at this very sad time. Your support means more than words can say.
Thank you from all of us!
Armand, Amy, Kaylin, Ace, Deb, Paxton, Larry and Patt Van Wanseele
Blaine

The Editor:
Because of Blaine resident Richard Clark’s generosity, many Blaine residents, and others from around the county were treated to a once-in-a-lifetime piano concert at the Blaine Performing Arts Center. 
This amazing classical performance was presented by Western Washington University piano professor Milica Jelaca-Jovanovic, and all that was asked for admission was a donation to the Food Bank. What a win-win way for everyone to be a part of such an elegant evening of music.
Thank you Mr. Clark and the many volunteers who made it possible. It was truly appreciated by those in attendance.
Aloha,
Carol Hogan
Blaine

The Editor:
I wonder what influence a Yamaha grand piano might have exerted upon the way Bach composed keyboard music. Transcriptions provide clues because they are Bach selections arranged for pianos.
Milica Jelaca-Jovanovic gave us excellent clues Saturday evening when she performed three Bach transcriptions of her own. Her arrangements never took the Baroque composer out of context.
Bach remained Bach, and I thought he might have composed in a manner similar to hers, if only he had owned a Yamaha grand piano. These were delightful works, and I understand they played a part toward the doctorate she earned at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
Jelaca-Jovanovic specializes in the works of Schumann, but Mr. Liszt refused to take a back seat to anyone that evening. He was animated and energized. He glowed! Professors Ford Hill, Jeffrey Gilliam and artist Sibyl Sanford agreed wholeheartedly.
Our audience was my greatest surprise. It was much larger than we had anticipated, it was populated with many children, and—best of all—everyone listened. Quiet as proverbial mice! When the concert ended, I wanted to hug everyone out there. God willing, I’m hoping to sponsor more concerts at our performing arts center, and in the future I will try to open another room for receptions that all may enjoy.
Not everyone in Blaine is wealthy. The notion of bringing freewill offerings for our Blaine Food Bank was not my original idea, but I now see wisdom in that approach. I know there were poor people in the audience, and I was glad to see them.
Richard Clark
Blaine

The Editor,
Please fund the Plover. After all the years of restoration, all the volunteers, all of the fundraising why stop now? We have a winner that everyone can enjoy, to cut funding at this point would just be throwing money away and from what I can make out its only $5,000. Option three is the way for me, the Plover is a part of Blaine and should have the backing of the powers that be.
Bob Knapp, Catnap Canvas
Blaine

The Editor:
This will be a difficult letter to write because the topic is difficult, but I will try to offer sources of information that readers can use for themselves. The premises is that it is a good idea to have an informed opinion rather than just flipping off!
On Friday, February 13, congress is apparently passing the largest spending bill in our history and calling it a stimulus bill, even though it is composed of the usual pet projects, and anything that could be called stimulative, like infrastructure spending will not kick in until 2010 or 2011.
The bill is about $900 billion but will be closer to $3 trillion in the end with debt servicing and other factors. The spending is to be funded by issuing large amounts of U.S. Treasury paper.
If this bill and the two TARP bailout bills are used, the result could be a downgrade of U.S. government debt, a refusal by other countries to buy our debt, skyrocketing interest rates, a dollar collapse, and hyperinflation. This would not be good!
The people who now head the various government financial agencies, Geithner, Bernanke, Schiapiro, Summers, Bair, etc. are the same people who have been in these financial agencies for decades, none of whom caught Enron, Worldcom, the New York banks, Bernard Madoff, or the dangers of selling layers of housing, credit card, car loan, student loan and other debt around the world as bonds.
The genesis of our financial mess can most reliably be laid at the feet of Alan Greenspan, the Federal Reserve chairman for about 20 years under both Clinton and Bush. Whenever we had a financial problem somewhere around the world, Mr. Greenspan threw money at it – in the ‘90s the Asian and Russian currencies and markets, a large New York hedge fund, Y2K, and the technology bubble and bust. In the 2000s, he kept interest rates too low for too long and sparked the housing bubble and bust. It is my opinion that throwing money at the credit bubble and bust we have now will not be possible because of the size of the problem and that economic recovery will take a long time, particularly because of the retirement needs of the large baby boom generation.
Good general information sources are the Wall Street Journal and Greenspan’s Bubbles, a 2008 book by Issaquah hedge fund manager and writer Bill Fleckenstein. A couple of good free web newsletters are www.johnmauldin.com and www.minyanville.com.
Fox business channel has a good program for those faced with deflating their own credit bubble on weekdays from 5 to 6 with Dave Ramsey.
Vancouver radio station CKNW 980 has a good finance program on Saturdays from 8:30 to 10 a.m.
Lucy Chambers
Blaine

The Editor:
What a timely letter in last week’s paper from C.E. Cain regarding the need for a flea market in Blaine! The Blaine Boys & Girls Club has been having the same thought! The Board of Directors has planned two community flea markets/rummage sales.
One will be held on the weekend of May 15-16¸ and will offer a perfect opportunity to get rid of all of the “treasures” that might make themselves known during spring cleaning. The second opportunity will be offered on the weekend of September 26-27, a great end-of-summer chance to part with items you don’t want to store for the winter.
We will be utilizing space on or near our Club at 635 H Street. We anticipate plenty of available space for all interested participants. Individuals can choose to sell their possessions themselves, or they can donate them to the Blaine Boys & Girls Club who will place them on sale for a Club fundraiser.
Please mark these two dates on your calendar and keep your eyes on future editions of The Northern Light for more specific details. You can also send me an email at kschulhauser@whatcomclubs.org with any questions about this event.
Karin Schulhauser, Director
Blaine Boys & Girls Club

The Editor:
Blaine Food Bank would like to take this opportunity to thank Dick Clark and his production team for sponsoring the classical piano recital to benefit our agency held on February 21 in Blaine.
Blaine Food Bank is pleased to announce the benefit performance yielded almost $1,600 in cash donations and over 200 pounds of food contributions.
We also extend our heartfelt gratitude to the renowned pianist, Milica Jelaca-Jovanovich, for her performance and to our community for enjoying the performance while aiding our food bank!
Robin Kendall, Manager
Blaine Food Bank

Letters Policy
The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank-you letters should be limited to 10 names. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please send your letter to:
225 Marine Drive, Blaine, WA 98230, fax 360/332-2777 or
E-mail:editor@thenorthernlight.com

Letters Policy

The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank you letters are limited to five individuals or groups. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please email letters to letters@thenorthernlight.com