Letters to the Editor -- February 14, 2008

Published on Thu, Feb 14, 2008
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Letters to the Editor

The Editor:
I am the grandparent of a child at Blaine elementary school. I was very shocked to find they do not have any recesses during the day! I guess my grandchild’s mother and I assumed they did. Primary school has recesses. Middle school and high school students change classes, so they are up and moving.
Elementary school students only have a lunch break. And I know for a fact, many of the children do not even eat their lunch, so they can get out and play, as this is the only time they have to play. There is something wrong with this picture.
Children at the elementary school are given what are called “infractions” for misbehavior in class. Many times these “infractions” are for talking, moving around, not paying attention, etc.
I believe many of these “infractions” would not happen if the children were allowed to have regular recess and use some of the energy they have at this age. How many parents also assume their children have recess? I think this is something that needs to be addressed.
Sherry Shawe
Blaine

The Editor:
Forty million dollars to upgrade Blaine public school so that it can compete with the ridiculous facilities of Bellingham schools! Facilities that rival many community colleges within our state. The article in last week’s issue of The Northern Light was preceded by a letter from a young man who expressed that the lack of pride in their school due to the fact that the “buildings were putty colored” and eating their lunch in the (gasp!) common area was in part causing the emotional issues of some students and hindering them academically because they were embarrassed by their school facilities and their poor athletic teams? They want to blame part of their academic failure and emotional distress on their school facilities?
Then by all means let’s take $150 more from families at a time when foreclosures are at an all time high, the economy is slowing down, gas prices have soared, let’s take more money from these families whose kids are suffering academically and emotionally more realistically due to problems at home, parents struggling financially, having to work more and be at home less for their child.
The flow of letters regarding the Blaine food bank have shown us that there are families in Blaine that can’t put food on their tables, the answer is putting more of the money earned by the parent back in his or her pocket so that they can provide for their children. Financial issues are one of the top three causes for fighting and divorce, maybe this has more bearing on the academic failure and emotional troubles of students. For those of you who don’t own a home, don’t think you’re immune from this tax, your landlord is going to pass it on to you. If you can afford the increase, think of those that can’t afford the skyrocketing gas and grocery bill, the increased mortgage. Think of these families, if you can afford the $150 increase in your property taxes, vote no and send the school a personal check, I’m sure Blaine schools will happily accept charitable donations, send more than $150 and you can write it off on your taxes, it’s win-win for everyone.
Sasha Chamorro
Blaine

The Editor:
It does seem Mr. White has problems reading. I do believe in giving everyone a fair chance to prove themselves. As for me I grew up here in Blaine. Yes, I was gone for a few years but was home to visit several times until I moved home for good. As for me being new to Blaine, I was born in 1960 and my family has been part of the Blaine/ Birch Bay area since before the turn of the last century. When did you come here? Besides you do not need to insult people and say things about our public servants that are demeaning. Most are doing the best they can. As for the high sewer rates you never said anything about it in you letter. You just started name calling and saying stuff that had no bearing on our city affairs. That’s my view – a new year, a clean slate. So please be nice as my mom told us. If you have nothing good to say or constructive don’t say anything at all. Thank you.
Polly Mason
Blaine

The Editor:
 I was appalled to read a verbatim quote of a Washington State Democratic Party worker (“There is absolutely no point in voting in the primary”) in Pat Donnell’s letter in the February 7 issue of The Northern Light.
Voter confusion abounds because the parties are choosing delegates differently – state Democrats via caucus, state Republicans splitting delegate designations between caucus and primary results. 
That abysmally ill-informed party worker gave Pat Donnell total misinformation! Both primaries count!
Though Democratic party delegates are being chosen by caucus, all supporters of Democratic presidential candidates should also vote the primary! Why? Because it’s very possible that final delegate designations might have to be “brokered” by so-called super-delegates at the national convention if, for example, the results for Clinton and Obama are tied or close to a tie. Super-delegates are 847 unpledged Democratic luminaries including former presidents Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter, former vice president Al Gore, Democratic governors and members of Congress, retired congressional leaders such as Dick Gephardt, and all Democratic National Committee members, some of whom are appointed by party chairman Howard Dean. 
As political analysts point out, super-delegates are therefore absolutely going to be watching numbers from all state primaries. (One wishes all super-delegates would follow the example of Democratic strategist/CNN political analyst Donna Brazile, a super-delegate herself; she’s vowed that if the convention ends up being brokered, she’ll withdraw from participation rather than revert to the days of “decisions made behind-doors in smoke-filled backrooms.”)
Don’t throw away your vote! Keep ‘em honest! Discourage campaign “spin-meistering” that can create false impressions that may influence future votes. Example: With all due respect to Senator Clinton, but proclaiming “victory” in Michigan’s primary - where she was the sole Democrat on the ballot - is spin, not fact (the Democratic National Committee stripped Michigan and Florida of their delegates as punishment for moving up the dates of their state primaries before February 5; Clinton was the only Democrat not to remove her name from Michigan’s ballot). Please vote the February 19 primary of your choice! If misinformation made you throw away your ballot, get a replacement from the county auditor’s office.
Jo Slivinski
Blaine

The Editor:
We wanted to say thank you to Sheriff Bill Elfo. You are always prompt in your replies and you always ensure that the job is followed through. Thank you for the wonderful job you do and for doing so with genuine care and compassion.
Liliana Robbins and family
Birch Bay 

The Editor:
Only 33,000 people were able to vote statewide in the Democratic caucus saturday, and it is undemocratic to leave hundreds of thousands out of the political process just because they couldn’t be at their caucus between 1 and 1:30 p.m. Saturday. To right this wrong, the Democratic super delegates of our great state should pledge their support to the winner of the primary on February 19, and make the democratic primary more than a beauty contest.
Gary McNally
Blaine

The Editor:
Soon, voters who live within the boundaries of the Blaine school district will be deciding whether to vote “Yes” for the levy/bond measure.
While these are not optimum economic times, we must continue to support our children’s education. A quality public education is one of the cornerstones of our democracy. Yet, we all know that nothing comes free. Our public schools are supported, in part, by extra tax levies. Improving or building new facilities calls for the issue of a bond measure.
Most of us think little about, and often look forward to upgrading our cell phones, cars, televisions, refrigerators, homes, etc. Often, we are so tickled to be upgrading, that we are willingly separated from our hard earned dollars. Even when we do not welcome upgrades, they often are necessary and they all cost money.
Public schools also require upgrades. In the years since many of us were educated, the technology, skills, and processes involved in education have gone through changes. Facilities, buses, teacher training, technology, curricular materials, sport equipment, etc. all require upgrades to reflect these changing needs. These also come at a price. We in Blaine believe that most want to give the children in our community a first class public education. We believe the price is one the voters are willing to share. We hold these beliefs because the Blaine community has a remarkable history of supporting its schools!
We hope you will look forward with excitement to providing facilities and educational upgrades for students in the Blaine School District. Together, the community can ensure that the excellent traditions, reputation and pride in Blaine’s public schools continue. Please join us in voting YES for Blaine schools.
George and Susan Holmes
Birch Bay

Letters Policy
The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank-you letters should be limited to 10 names. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please send your letter to:
225 Marine Drive, Blaine, WA 98230 or fax 360/332-2777.
E-mail:editor@thenorthernlight.com

Letters Policy

The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank you letters are limited to five individuals or groups. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please email letters to letters@thenorthernlight.com