Letters to the Editor -- December 13, 2007

Published on Thu, Dec 13, 2007
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Letters to the Editor

The Editor:
In remembrance of December 7, 1941. Many are yet with us who’ve personal memories of that day, and for those knowing it only as history, with gratitude, I’ll recount both as my experience.
As a lad of six years in ’41, I had no grasp of its significance, my heartfelt sentiments about that day go back to my first mission between Tachikawa A.B., Japan and Hickam AFB, Honolulu in 1955. After closing up our C-124 Globemaster and bused to transient barracks for our overnight stay, I was walking up the stairs to our bunks in structures built during the Roosevelt era ’30s, intended to make a statement Hawaii was U.S. Territory! And there, etched in the stone wall, a line of bullet holes remained as silent reminders of December 7, 1941.
I, as an American airman, have never been more moved than by seeing those silent reminders of brothers lost to war’s tragic inevitability, that fateful day.
Bob Hendricks, Airman 1st Class,
U.S.A.F. Korean Conflict
Blaine

The Editor:
This week I read with interest – and more than a little unease – about efforts underway to eventually incorporate Birch Bay. Personally, I don’t see any good coming from this. To fund a local government takes money: Money to pay city employees and government officials; money for local government facilities and equipment; Money to bring the proposed city into compliance with county, state, and federal regulations. In areas such as Blaine, Ferndale, and Lynden there exist businesses and industries that with their tax dollars help fund city activities. Birch Bay has practically none that can share the load. Birch Bay residents would be asked to bear the burden of funding a city’s operations practically alone.
Furthermore, as a city, full-time Birch Bay residents would be exposed to liabilities (legal and financial) that they don’t have to worry about at the present.
Birch Bay already has a water and sewer district, as well as a fire station and county bus service. Other services are but a short distance away.
As a full time Birch Bay resident, I can’t see where proponents of Birch Bay’s incorporation have the interests of Birch Bay’s full-time residents at heart.
Bob Aiken
Birch Bay

The Editor:
I have followed the controversy of the Blaine council proceedings with the decision to close the airport in 2008. I offer some insights: 1) Any community depends on transportation aspects for growth. 2) Land values are higher for tax base than an airport. Blaine and Lynden have airports within the city limits. 3) Re-locate the airport, but make it a first class, small plane airport with all the facilities, not just an airstrip. It should be located away from cultivated agricultural land and electrical transmission lines. As Bellingham International Airport grows it will realize that small planes are a hazard and a nuisance to larger jet aircraft. 4) If done right this could become a county small plane airport under the Port of Bellingham control, much like Skagit County Airport. 5) Use vacated airport land for retail, commercial and industrial uses with family wage jobs. No big box stores, as they destroy small community retail stores leaving empty buildings and provides minimum wage/part-time jobs. Profits then go out of state. 6) If a county small plane airport is developed, federal aviation authority could provide development funds. Money from current airport land sales might also help fund development. 7) Blaine and Lynden would have a better tax base. A win-win situation. 8) A good location might be near exit 270 east of I-5, centrally located with access for Blaine, Lynden, Birch Bay, Ferndale and Bellingham roadways. 9) The downside would be that immigration would need to service the airport on cross-border flights.
This is my suggestion for future small plane transportation needs of western Washington as this area grows.
Earl Erickson
Birch Bay

The Editor:
A foot bridge to Semiahmoo Spit is a good idea. It should be added to the wharf plan right away. Blaine benefits by being able to walk out to the spit, etc. Just think of all the health-conscious folks who will want to walk the entire loop around Blaine Harbor! With the Blaine Harbor bridge connector they will be able to do it!
I’ve seen a lot of really great, functional bridges. The one in Redding, California comes to mind. People got together and wanted a bridge, worked hard for it, and it came about. I think a connector bridge could provide a striking architectural feature for Blaine Harbor. It would be a focal point for visitors and local residents alike.
Those who are interested in seeing a bridge for Blaine Harbor and Semiahmoo may join the Blaine Harbor Bridge Committee, 1300 Peace Portal Drive, Blaine, WA 98230.
Larry Bellamy
Blaine

The Editor:
My name is Jeff Worthy, and I am an English teacher at Blaine high school. In March, the Blaine school district will be putting two crucial measures before the voters; a capital projects bond and a maintenance and operations levy.
Both of these measures are of vital importance to the continuing educations of Blaine students, and I would like to wholeheartedly endorse them, and ask all who read these words to do so as well.
When I first came to Blaine high school in the fall 1994, we had a little over 300 students. We are now pushing 750, and we are simply running out of space for them with the current facility. Whole classes have to be taught in rooms in the middle school as we do not have the space necessary to accommodate them. I have known what it is like to teach English Literature in a biology lab due to not having a classroom of my own. I have known what it is to not have an environment suited to the subject area assigned to you.
Teaching is a remarkably rewarding profession and I could not imagine doing anything else; at the same time, it is a very challenging job, and to do it well and have our students be successful we need to provide the best possible learning environments for them.
The capital bond project will provide our students and teachers with the resources and space necessary to maximize their potentials. It will give us a facility to be proud of for decades to come, and provide our teachers and students with all they need to meet the challenges of life in the 21st century.
Our children represent the future of our community and nation. We must lead by example, and show them through our approval of these measures that we value their educations - that we value and believe in them -and that we support their endeavors.
The maintenance and operations levy will supply the schools with the necessities of operation and allow us to continue to offer the programs that we do.
I am proud to be a teacher at Blaine high school, and could not imagine working elsewhere. I have seen other schools in other communities, and I thank the powers that brought me here every day as I step into an environment where I know education is valued.
We must show our students that we will continue to value their educations by voting in the affirmative for both of these measures. Please help me send them that message! Thank you.
Jeff Worthy
Blaine

Letters Policy
The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank-you letters should be limited to 10 names. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please send your letter to:
225 Marine Drive, Blaine, WA 98230 or fax 360/332-2777.
E-mail:editor@thenorthernlight.com

Letters Policy

The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank you letters are limited to five individuals or groups. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please email letters to letters@thenorthernlight.com