Letters to the Editor -- September 06, 2007

Published on Thu, Sep 6, 2007
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Letters to the Editor

The Editor:
I have a passion for peace so the date of September 21, the International Day of Peace, is full of meaning for me. Peace is a gift the world needs to give to our children and to all of us. The question is how can we as individuals help to bring this about?
We are a world of many races, cultures, religions and philosophies. On a day-to-day basis, we do not often have opportunities to meet and develop a true understanding of those differences and thus fear and prejudices develop.
But just think, if we were all exactly alike, would it not be a bit boring. I believe these differences create a beautiful mosaic with wonderful opportunities for new experiences.
We have all heard of the golden rule but I found it very interesting to see the many similar versions expressed by the various religions and philosophies in our world. Here are some of them:
Baha’i – “Blessed is he who preferreth his brother before himself.”- Bah’a’u’ll’ah
Buddhism – “Hurt not others in ways that you yourself would find hurtful.”- Udana-Varga 5:18; Christianity – “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you,”- Jesus: The Bible, Luke 6:13; Confucianism – “Do not do to others what you do not want them to do to you.” – Analects 15:23; Hinduism – “This is the sum of duty: do naught unto others which would cause you pain if done to you.” – Mahabharta 5:1517; Islam – “No one of you is a believer until you desire for another that which you desire for yourself.” – The Sunnah (from the Hadith) publ. 1975; Janism – “A man should wander about treating all creatures as he himself would be treated.” – Sutrakritanga 1.11.33; Jewish – “Love your neighbor as yourself.”- Leviticus 19:18; Native American – “Respect for all life is the foundation.” – The Great Law of Peace; Sikhism – “Don’t create hatred with anyone as God is within everyone.”- Guru Arjan Devji, Siri Guru Granth Sabhib; Sufism – “You must see in the heart of another the temple of God.” – Hazrat Inayay Khan: The Art of Being; Taoism – “I am good to the man who is good to me; likewise, I am also good to the bad man.” – Tao Te Ching; Secular – “We should conduct ourselves toward others as we would have them act toward us.” Aristotle, 385 B.C.
If we seek the common ground with our fellow man and treat them with the respect we each desire, it will go a long way to creating the desired outcome of peace. Peace to you all.
Dottie Barnicoat, 
Birch Bay

The Editor:
Christ the King is a new church in town. Its congregation meets on the campus of the Blaine school district. The King strikes me as operating a bit like big box industries that make a wide sweep across a broad area while zeroing in on target communities to serve them in the style of intimate families. How is this done?
The King has discovered an approach traceable to the Acts of the Apostles. That’s the fifth book of the New Testament, you know. The congregation is a bit like an apple pie. The whole is sliced into several servings called koinonias. Each koinonia is a fellowship of 10 parishioners. Although the whole may be somewhat greater than the sum of its parts, each part plays an important role in spreading the Good News.
In my home is a living-room table with room for six people. So I am inviting half of one King koinonia – that’s five parishioners – to visit me on Thursday, September 6, at 7 p.m. sharp. Please avoid coming late; I’m always annoyed when people creep in while a meeting is in session. Act quickly; this is a late notice.
The agenda: 1. Because the meeting will fall on the 86th anniversary of the International Peace Arch, we shall remember founder Sam Hill, the Quaker who said, “War satisfies neither the victors nor the vanquished. Perfect peace alone satisfies.” 2. We shall discuss what may be done to implement the city of Blaine’s official theme titled “Promoting Peace,” and unanimously adopted by the city council in1998. 3. International Peace Day falls on September 21. We shall discuss what the King plans to do in order to observe it, or better, how to activate it.
My door will be open at 6:30 p.m. for informal chitchat. That way, we may become acquainted while assuring the meeting will begin on time. Come to 223 B Street at the southeast corner of Second and B in Blaine. Phone 332-5175. The meeting will adjourn at 9 p.m. I’m expecting five Kingpins to appear – no more, no less.
Richard Clark
Blaine

The Editor:
I was told the other day that someone I met years ago recently passed away. Her name was Tammy Zlotnik. And in remembrance of her I write this letter.
Though I only had the privilege of spending a short time with Tammy she made a big impression on my life. She, like myself, was an artist and mostly our conversations revolved around the topic of painting. She was a woman of small stature who painted colorfully, boldly, and expressively. She liked to paint on big canvases. She was also an art therapist. She worked with kids, many of who were troubled teens, helping them heal and express themselves through art. Tammy was a small lady who did big things.
One of the many things that was unique about Tammy was the fact that she did not own a car. She traveled by bicycle. Sometimes she told me she simply ran to work or to where she had to be. In a society that is so dependant on the burning of fossil fuels; we as a people seem not to be able to work or recreate without poisoning the planet, Tammy brought a breath of fresh air wherever she went. She led her own life free from convention, showing me and others that there is another way. One that will leave the world a better place. We can no longer believe or count on government or established institutions to solve the problems that besiege our troubled planet.
Now is the time for each of us to take personal responsibility for the world we live in. Let’s think more of life than profit. Let’s take it a little slower and breathe. Get on your bike or walk to work or to the store and while you are there buy local goods and produce. Take some time to soak up the natural beauty that surrounds us here in the Northwest. As a planet we seem to be on a slippery slope to destruction. It’s time for each of us to dig in our heels. By doing so we can lead healthier and happier lives and so will are kids and their kids.
So thank you Tammy for making such a large difference in people’s lives and leaving such a small footprint on our mother earth. I know your friends and family will miss you immensely. I think of you every time I hop on my bike and breathe in a big gulp of fresh air!
Jim Agnello
Birch Bay

The Editor:
The orphanages in Iraq and Uganda will each receive over $700 because of the generosity of the people of Blaine. Thanks to all of you who were part of the community garage sale, either with donated items or purchases. And a special thanks to the many people who gave outright gifts of cash (over half the money raised).
I apologize to those who wanted to participate but couldn’t because of the short notice. Because of the great response in community for these orphans in troubled places, we’ll plan on another community garage next year for the same purpose. This generous response is one more bit of evidence of the great community we have in Blaine.
Margaret Gibson, RN, BSN
Blaine

The Editor:
I would like to make this an open letter to the parents of Blaine school children or anyone else who drives children to school and to the citizens who drive by the Blaine schools.
I have walked children to and from school for 16 years and last year was one of the worst years I have seen for bad driving in and around the schools. Some of the things I saw last year were drivers talking on cell phones. One driver was talking on the cell phone while drinking their coffee, another driver was reading the newspaper, many drivers were going much faster than the posted 20 m.p.h., some drivers were putting on their make up, many drivers did not stop for the crossing guards or children at cross walks and a number of drivers dropping off their children in front of the elementary school then pulling back into traffic on Mitchell Street with a u-turn. Now add into the mix the drivers who dropped off their children on the west side of Mitchell Street and the children crossed the street, either behind or in front of their parent’s cars. This all adds up to a child being seriously injured.
Please, when you are driving around or near the Blaine schools, especially before or after school slow down, put down your newspapers, hang up your cell phones, do not do your make up and watch for children crossing the streets, pay attention to the crossing guards and have your children cross the street at crosswalks, after all cars have stopped.
If everyone follows these few simple safety rules, the children going to the Blaine schools will have a safe year and there will not be any child versus car injuries.
Anita Cunningham
Blaine

Letters Policy
The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank-you letters should be limited to 10 names. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please send your letter to:
225 Marine Drive, Blaine, WA 98230 or fax 360/332-2777.
E-mail:editor@thenorthernlight.com

Letters Policy

The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank you letters are limited to five individuals or groups. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please email letters to letters@thenorthernlight.com