Letters to the Editor -- April 12, 2007

Published on Thu, Apr 12, 2007
Read More Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor

The Editor:
At the recent Michael Lykins fundraiser, Ferndale high school agricultural teacher Mr. Mitch Davis, offered to have his head shaved by the highest bidder to help raise money.
At 8 p.m. the silent auction closed and dozens of high school students, college students and fellow members of Michael’s lacrosse team placed Mr. Davis in a chair on top of a table so everyone could watch and got the sheers out.
Meanwhile, a volunteer called the winner of this auction item on the phone and said, “Where are you? You won the right to buzz-cut Mr. Davis’ head.”
When I said I was at home he said, “Well, get down here, we are all waiting.” I told him I thought the teacher was an awesome guy to have his head shaved like this and I would be willing to pay the money and let him keep his hair.
There was a long pause and then a, “Ohhh nooo! We are all waiting right now.” I asked him to put Mr. Davis on the phone. When he came to the phone I thanked him for being such a great teacher and let him know I was willing to pay the price and let him keep his hair.
With no pause I just heard a loud “Yahoo!” and a big belly laugh.
When I went in to pay the next day, Mrs. Kranz who along with her husband made the fundraiser possible, said all the young men were quite taken back by the change of events and the evening ended in an uproar.
Mr. Mitch Davis left with his hair intact and the fundraiser was a wild success.
Thanks to everyone for your support and continued prayers for Michael Lykins. There are signs of hope coming from Michael.
Mark Simard
Birch Bay

The Editor:
It looks as though my last month’s letter and that of the mayor touched a raw nerve. It makes me think that airport supporters should consider hiring someone to ghost-write letters as well.
The letters that ran in last week’s letters column talk around a major point involved in closing the airport: The cost.
There are leases that will have to be bought out. A lot of aircraft owners will be forced to find hangar space in southwest Washington or in Canada, because hangar shortages haven’t been addressed by other airports in Whatcom County.
At least two businesses will be adversely affected by the closing of the airport. (One will have to shut down completely.) State grant money accepted by the city will have to be paid back.
If the airport is closed, it will be a good time to be a lawyer in this area. Litigation will be a growth industry. Although the city manager (who may not be a huge fan of keeping the airport open) has stated that the costs of closing the airport might be around $1.5 million, there are indications that with court fights, buyouts, returned grant money, and other compensation, the costs will run much higher.
It’s beginning to look like that cost will be higher than whatever the city can realize off of the sale of the airport land. The city taxpayers will have to pick up the tab for what’s left.
As I see it, if the airport is closed, the city will be balled up in litigation, the airport property will go to developers (who probably will be able to do whatever they desire), the city will lose an asset that will become more valuable as the Olympics in Vancouver get closer, and a few folks will become wealthy.
As I have said repeatedly, the only bright ray of sunshine in being a Birch Bay resident is that if the airport is closed, my tax dollars won’t go to subsidizing the ensuing circus.
Bob Aiken
Blaine

The Editor:
I am writing to inform readers in my community that April is autism awareness month and one out of 150 children will be diagnosed with autism. One out of 94 boys will be diagnosed with autism.
Every year more children are diagnosed with autism than aids, childhood leukemia, childhood diabetes and breast cancer combined. Autism steals a child every 20 minutes. Although autism is a genetic disorder, there is no known cause or cure.
My 4-year-old son William was diagnosed with autism two years ago. I am still so shocked at how little the public knows about autism.
William is non-verbal. However, through early intervention he is making amazing progress. He is communicating through PECS (picture symbols) and is learning sign language. He is such a hard worker. Autism always presents itself before the age of three.
The earlier the intervention the better. There are several warning signs.
Some include lack of eye contact, loss of (or none of) babbling or speech, missing or losing of developmental milestones, no response to name, and no pretend or imaginative play.
Please visit the www.autismspeaks.org or my personal web site at www.myspace.com/autism-awareness to get more information and to learn all the early warning signs.It is often said “If you do not know someone who is affected by autism. You will very soon.”
Please be aware, please get involved, this is truly a worldwide crisis.
Kay, big sis Victoria and
William Thomas
Blaine

Letters Policy
The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank-you letters should be limited to 10 names. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please send your letter to:
225 Marine Drive, Blaine, WA 98230 or fax 360/332-2777.
E-mail:editor@thenorthernlight.com

Letters Policy

The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank you letters are limited to five individuals or groups. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please email letters to letters@thenorthernlight.com