Letters to the Editor -- April 13, 2006

Published on Thu, Apr 13, 2006
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Letters to the Editor

The Editor:
Volunteers are needed to keep the doors open at Semiahmoo Park museum.
Last year we had 789 visitors and that was just on weekends. This year we have heat in the building which means we could have a longer season if there were more volunteers to greet the guests.
As volunteer jobs go, this is the best. We get to meet the nicest people who come from all over the world and visit our historic display of fishing and cannery artifacts. The visitors really want to know all about it and are delighted with the video histories of fish traps, the Star Fleet of tall ships and Semiahmoo Cannery before it became a resort. Among our treasures they find a trophy 57-pound salmon caught right in our bay and a 28-foot Bristol Bay fishing boat. They are struck by the beauty of Mt. Baker as seen from Semiahmoo spit.
This is the best show in town and we need more people to keep the door open and greet the visitors. One afternoon a month and a friendly smile are the requirements. Retirees are especially encouraged to apply. Training is provided. The season officially opens May 27. Please call me at 371-3558 for more details.
Sunny Brown
Blaine

The Editor:
For all of you that struggle with driving around Whatcom County in the traffic with all of its rules and regulations, I would give you a medal if you could last five minutes of driving in this town I live in in China. There are no rules for driving here, you can go through red lights, as many as four people to a motorcycle, you can drive the wrong way on a one-way street, you can make a U-turn in the middle of any street. If you cross the street you take your life into your own hands because pedestrians have no right-of-way and bicycles have as much right to the main roads as do cars.
With all of the chaos on the streets around here there are less accidents per year with no rules, than in the states, with all of our rules.
The bus system here is wonderful. It costs me 20 cents to travel to town and it is so enjoyable. All the people on the bus wait to try and talk to me.
The ride itself is a little scary because there is no speed limit and the bus drivers are all crazy behind the wheel, but they handle the buses like they were driving a race car, and they will go down streets that are so narrow that you stop and wonder how two people walking side by side could fit and the bus goes down these streets at breakneck speeds without hitting the sidewalls.
Taxi service is also very inexpensive because the fees are negotiable, no matter how far you wish to go.
Walking around, it is a great adventure to get to know the area and the people. I have never been treated as well as I have been here by the people around the town and near my residence.
I feel like royalty here.
Just recently I bought dinner for eight people whom I hardly knew, we had nine dishes of food and there was food left over and it cost me the equivalent of $16 U.S., without a tip. Tipping is not expected here and when I do it out of habit these people keep trying to give it back.
The next time I write about my experiences here I will talk about the incredible bargains here, which are all negotiable.
Have a great week Blaine.
David White
Blaine

The Editor:
I am working on the Blaine high school class of 1996 reunion and there are a handful of people I have not been able to contact.
If you graduated in 1996 from BHS and have not been contacted about the reunion, please contact Angie Dixon (Nymeyer) at 332-2544 or email at colbydixon@verizon.net.
The reunion is scheduled for August 5 and 6, 2006. Invitations will be going out this week and we would like to find everyone as soon as possible.
If you were in this class, but did not graduate with us please contact me, we would like to include everyone who was a part of this class.
Thank you.
Angie Dixon (Nymeyer)
Blaine

The Editor:
Recently I reread a letter in the November 24, 2005 issue of The Northern Light, “The preview to the U.S.A.”
Some week later, in mid-December, I crossed into the U.S. shortly after 9 p.m. Christmas lights told of the holiness of the Christmas season. The burning candles of a menorah spoke of creation. What a glorious sight to see the towering arch, a symbol of peace.
What a shocking surprise to be confronted by a military marker. I recalled the words of Pearl S. Buck. They described the military as destructive, consuming and creating nothing.
For certain, I agree “the fallen” should be remembered. The question is why here?
The park is dedicated to peace – creation, enlightenment, learning and truth. It’s not, in my view, about aggression, destruction and death. I was incensed by the contrast. I sincerely hope the park committee will consider having the marker relocated.
Jean Male
Blaine

Correction:
?In the last issue of The Northern Light, we incorrectly listed Hazard Promotions as one of the largest promotional product companies in the United States.
Hazard Promotions is an independently owned and operated distributorship of Adventures in Advertising, which is one of the largest promotional products companies in the United States.
Also, John Baldwin moved to Blaine in 2004, and does not have a healthcare management job in the cardiac division of St Joseph Hospital. Rather, he is employed as a registered nurse in the cath lab of St. Joseph Hospital.
The Northern Light regrets these and any other errors.

Letters Policy
The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank-you letters should be limited to 10 names. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please send your letter to:
225 Marine Drive, Blaine, WA 98230 or fax 360/332-2777.
E-mail:editor@thenorthernlight.com

Letters Policy

The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank you letters are limited to five individuals or groups. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please email letters to letters@thenorthernlight.com