Letters to the Editor -- March 09, 2006

Published on Thu, Mar 9, 2006
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Letters to the Editor

The Editor:
I am writing concerning your front page article in the February 23 edition, titled “Local leaders call for delay in border ID requirements.”
I noted some irony. First, the representative from the governor’s office (Ginatta) fails to mention that Washington has not complied with the requirement to make its driver’s licenses “secure travel documents.” Why not?
Second, he talks of an “artificial deadline,” that is 2008, for compliance with federal law in this regard. He is probably the same person to complain that since September 11, the federal government is not working fast enough to make the borders safe. But, is it not true that Washington state is not doing its part to comply?
Thirdly, the chamber of commerce representative Ken Oplinger paints a doomsday picture if passports are required. He notes, for example, that a passport costs $100. He fails to mention that this cost provides a passport valid for 10 years, or about $10 per year for the privilege of a passport? He then discusses “spontaneous travel.” If travelers got passports, then they could travel “spontaneously.”
Both of these representatives are not being objective. They have vested interests, none of which includes safeguarding our borders as a priority. Yes, good interviewing techniques at the border can prevent some criminal intrusion. However, standardizing personal identification in the form of a passport seems a small investment in complementing this strategy.
Doug Tomaso
Blaine

The Editor:
There are several reasons why I ask the city of Blaine to adopt Pugwash, Nova Scotia, as its sister city. I therefore beg your attendance at city hall, March 16 at 7 p.m. Let me address possible pitfalls.
1. Fears that Blaine may be overrun with students vandalizing it during radical demonstrations are unlikely to occur. I have thoroughly studied the history of our Peace Arch. Only in May 1970 did a group of demonstrators ever invade Blaine. But that wasn’t because we had a sister city in Canada. It was related to Nixon’s order to invade Cambodia.
2. It is commonly but erroneously thought any program that doesn’t cost money is of little worth. The sister city concept doesn’t entail a fixed expense. This doesn’t eradicate its importance. It is extremely important; its implications are immense.
3. Frankly, I do not enjoy robust rapport with our city council. I can only hope the members will overlook my shortcomings, try to consider the sister city concept apart from the person who proposes it, and give the proposal serious attention.
4. Some people believe world peace will never dawn, therefore it isn’t worth the effort. I agree, world peace may never become a reality. The world is filled with egocentric individuals in ethnocentric societies. I disagree that it is not worth the effort. We must give world peace our best effort. It constitutes honorable action in the face of crying need.
5. Communities commonly curtail their social boundaries. A sister city offers refreshing opportunities to gain another perspective, to broaden our boundaries and enrich our Peace Arch city. It won’t break the bank, and it could help us better objectify our place in the sun.
6. Without community support, the sister city concept will fail. Support of clergy, council and educators is absolutely crucial. I no longer have the energy effectively to promote the sister city cause, nor am I a talented team worker. I can only propose an idea that is potentially powerful for the good of all. And I can only rely upon your participation.
Richard Clark
Blaine

The Editor:

I was in the fourth grade math champs group and I would like to thank Pam Amundson-Cochran for stepping up and coaching the fourth grade math champs. I appreciate Pam getting up on Tuesday and Thursday mornings to teach a whole bunch of kids algebra, probability, geometry, and the other things we needed to know to go to the competition. I thank her for doing the math champs fourth grade so much! Thank you Pam!
I would also like to thank Bill Wright for starting math champs in this county 24 years ago. It is such a fun event. I will be going to it until I can’t go anymore. So I would like to thank him for doing this every year for the past 24 years. Thank you Mr. Wright!
I would also like to say thank you to the team of 11 that went through three months of extra-curricular math work. We should all be proud.
Nick Butschli
Blaine

The Editor:
I want to thank fire district #13 and the Bellingham paramedics for all their help and for using such great care for my husband on the way to the hospital. Also thank you to the hospital staff who tried to save the life of my husband, James K. Leighton.
I want to thank his sons Rick and Lenny, and my friends (verbally adopted son Duane Taylor, goddaughters Linsey Pike and Lacey Taylor and Laird); Eileen Queen, Neil Smyth and Garry and Pauline Hummer for their support at the hospital.
Thanks to all my friends and family that came to Jimmy’s service at the Legion. Thanks to Legion Post #86 and Unit #86 for all of their help.
A special thanks for his friend Lou Parberry of some 30-plus years for coming to his service.
Thanks to Pam Christianson for getting the wake okayed by Homestead. Jim always spoke of wanting a wake on the family property at his shop. Thanks to the Homestead developer for letting us have the wake there. Thanks to Shauna Pilante and Linda Muir for your help in setting it up. Thanks Linda for the signs and thanks friends for showing up.
Thanks to my friends, co-workers and shop manager at Montigo Del Ray Corp for their caring and support during this difficult time.
Thanks for all the wonderful cards. Thanks and God bless.
Charlene Leighton
Blaine

The Editor:
A poem called “I am Meth,” was recently brought to my attention. I do not know who wrote it, but with all the Homeland Security and border changes that are in the future, it seems to me we already have our guard down and not much is being done to stop the terror we already have in every state, almost every town in the U.S. and worldwide – meth.
It seems to me that all the money being used to build our fences bigger from terrorists has already failed; we are not fighting the epidemic that is here to stay unless more is done now.
Leslie Oberholtzer
Blaine

Letters Policy
The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank-you letters should be limited to 10 names. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please send your letter to:
225 Marine Drive, Blaine, WA 98230 or fax 360/332-2777.
E-mail:editor@thenorthernlight.com

Letters Policy

The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank you letters are limited to five individuals or groups. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please email letters to letters@thenorthernlight.com