Letters to the Editor -- December 09, 2004

Published on Thu, Dec 9, 2004
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Letters to the Editor

The Editor:
As a resident of the Birch Bay/Blaine area, I was helping a new neighbor familiarize himself with the locations of different businesses and public services. In order to show him all the amenities, services and wonderful little extras that we have to offer, I located www.Blaine.net and I was so disappointed to note how out of date some of the pages are!
If a tourist were going to stop in Blaine, they would probably want something to eat, but I hope they don’t check out the list of restaurants for, if memory serves me, eight of them no longer exist! On the retail store page, eight of them don’t exist anymore either and then on the nightlife, out of three listed, one of them is no longer in business as is one of the banks listed!
Don’t frustrate any newcomer by sending them on a wild goose chase, they won’t come back! Please get whoever is responsible for updating the website to get it done or pretty soon we won’t need a chamber of commerce because there won’t be any people who want to patronize the local businesses and therefore we will lose more of our businesses!
If we are going to have a great website for new arrivals or tourists to check out our amenities, let’s at least make sure the amenities are still there and list any new ones. This isn’t just a case of “just haven’t had time to update the site” – some of the businesses listed haven’t been in operation for several years! The rest of the website is wonderful, informative and attractive, just some of the information is incorrect! Thank you.
Linda Lawrence
Blaine

The Editor:
I’ve been crossing the border at Blaine for many years; to spend time in White Rock. Never yet have I been stopped by a White Rock police officer, even though on a couple of occasions I was not clear about which lane I should be in and was going from one lane to the next, finally figuring out where I should be. An officer was observing my actions from across the street in his patrol car – but never stopped me.
White Rock caters to the American visitors who come there to enjoy shopping and dining out. Blaine officers should show the same courtesy to our Canadian “families.”
Joyce Crane
Blaine

The Editor:
A young lad working at Cost Cutter in Blaine found my wallet when he brought in the shopping carts and turned it in. I came in the next day to give him a monetary reward, and they told me I couldn’t do that because it’s not the store policy.
I am very grateful to this young lad as I came to do my shopping here. Also it was my birthday, and it would have been a very bleak and sad day for my birthday if I would have lost all my money and credit cards.
Thank you so much.
Gloria Corrins
Vancouver, B.C.

The Editor:
With the 10 Commandments being removed from public buildings, no prayers in schools, the pledge of allegiance being challenged for “under God” and Christmas being called a “holiday,” I think it is totally irresponsible of Pastor Rieke to inject his political vent in the newspaper. I must also ask, since when is being a conservative an “alternative” lifestyle?
There have been so many church vs. state court proceedings over the past few years and I always view the states as idiots, but now I’m not sure where to lay the blame on the breakdown of the Christian religion.
Pastor Rieke, of all people, should not be injecting his politics into religion.
If this is what he has to offer from the pulpit, God save us all.
A conservative Christian,
Kathleen Norman
Blaine

The Editor:
What’s the hardest lesson for piano teachers to render and students to master? Intervals? Scales? Arpeggios? Reading? Memorizing? It’s none of these. One challenge stands above all.
Listening.
That answer shouldn’t come as a surprise.
What’s the hardest lesson for city councilors, staff and administrators to master? Funding projects? Getting grants? Budgeting? Winning the game called tourism? It’s none of these. One challenge stands above all.
Listening.
City councilors, staff and administrators render doubtful ears toward that answer. They must preface it with a question of their own.
Who’s talking? Well, in this case, I am. Sunday evening I listened to Peace Arch Conversations and “The Voices of Change.” Thanks to Jerry Gay and KARI radio, I received a cartload of information. Here’s my reaction.
I was pleased to hear the word “demographics” floating through the conversation. But the speakers didn’t seem to understand the threefold connection between demography, geography and sociology. I heard vague references to boundaries and multiculturalism. (Blaine is confined within a natural boundary to the west, an international boundary to the north, and the rest is determined by city limits alone.) Ideals bubbled to the surface, but the context was cloudy.
Our community is a social petri dish. In it, we see a population growing in heterogeneity as well as size. Our speakers, examining the dish, weren’t quite certain what to make of it. Homework is needed. More analysis.
Meanwhile, the speakers discussed the problem of values. High on the list was a “mix” of community components (e.g. ideal housing, shopping, tourist attraction) in a “village” setting. The list is hardly new. What they didn’t seem to grasp was the fact old values persist, but the multifaceted problem has dramatically changed. We see two important concerns affected: Priorities and planning. Among the questions this raises, I would include the boardwalk. Ought it to be a high-priority item at this stage of planning?
It’s hazardous to operate on dreams or “visioning” as it’s popularly called. We first need a closer examination of our social petri dish. Is anybody listening?
Richard Clark
Blaine

The Editor:
With the cold weather upon us, I am very happy to thank Cost Cutter for holding their annual coat drive; Classic Cleaners for cleaning them all; and the many members of our community who donated the coats! The final count is in and last year’s number was surpassed by almost 100, with a total of 286 coats donated! Here at the Blaine Family Service Center we have given away many of these coats already. For those who don’t know, we are on H Street across from the Boys & Girls Club, in a room above the middle school gym. If your family needs coats or help with other basic needs, please drop in or give us a call at 332-0740. Again, thanks to Cost Cutter, Classic Cleaners and our very giving community members.
Larissa Dhanani
Blaine Family Service Center
Blaine

The Editor:
Mr. Gray, you’ve taught my son Nathan to play the trumpet. Nathan started in band in sixth grade and now, in 11th grade, has dropped out of band, which I have to say made me a bit sad. I felt as if he would lose all interest in making music.
Well, tonight my son played Silent Night on an old guitar that is missing a string. It was the most beautiful sound, it touched my heart. Now I guess I’d better get the needed string.
So Mr. Gray, thank you for giving my son the skills he needed to teach himself to play the guitar. I will forever be grateful to you for that. Oh, and thanks for all you’ve taught my Katie. Her flute playing is sounding great.
Mahala Elliott
Blaine

The Editor:
With three weeks remaining on the matching gift fundraising campaign, Blaine Extreme Sports Club is pleased to announce that over $700 has been donated in the past few weeks to meet this challenge. Doug Connelly approached Jon Landis, vice-president of the club, and asked about the status of the park. He offered to donate $5,000 more to the park. He told Jon, “Raise as much money as you can through December 31 and I will match it dollar for dollar up to $5,000.”
He would like to see the local community support this endeavor and has offered this challenge to meet our goal of getting the park completed as soon as possible.
Mr. Connelly told us that we live in a great community with a bunch of great kids. He would like them to have this facility so they can skateboard, in-line skate and BMX bike ride. The city of Blaine lacks activities and facilities for the kids so this will be a positive addition to our community. The club needs the citizens of Blaine to help reach this goal. Donations may be sent to P.O. Box 3361, Blaine, WA 98231.
Blaine Extreme Sports Club is a non-profit organization recognized by the state of Washington and the Internal Revenue Service and as such, donations are tax deductible.
Dori Binder
Blaine

Letters Policy
The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank-you letters should be limited to 10 names. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please send your letter to:
225 Marine Drive, Blaine, WA 98230 or fax 360/332-2777.
E-mail:editor@thenorthernlight.com

Letters Policy

The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank you letters are limited to five individuals or groups. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please email letters to letters@thenorthernlight.com