Letters to the Editor -- August 01, 2002

Published on Thu, Aug 1, 2002
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Letters to the Editor



Metaphor man strikes back

The Editor:
Regarding my “Missing Flags” letter of June 27, five readers tripped on my metaphors and missed the meaning.
Robert: The fact flags fly along the freeway doesn’t guarantee they were put there for commercial purposes. An anonymous freeway flag-flying merchant disagrees. Should a flag carry a slogan like “Blaine Loves Canada,” we could consider it commercial and I’d salute it.
James: Yes, the U.S.A. lost 3,000 citizens on 9/11. Before U.S. troops arrived in France, over 3,500 Canadians died at Vimy Ridge in 1917. Canadian Tiger Moths were in aerobatic training over Blaine in 1939, many months before 12/7. By entering two world wars years earlier than the U.S.A., American lives were saved. Is that worth a peak at a red maple leaf?
Polly: Don’t sweat the small stuff? Note chapter 38: “Tell Three People How Much You Love Them.” Am I eligible? You say a flag is “just” a symbol. I’m willing to place my hand over my heart and salute it. But my hand shakes a little when I remember Enron and WorldCom. I’m sure Bin Laden loves crooked corporate executives who damage their country from within. Who said, “Ask not what your country can do for you . . .”?
Regina: So you’ve seen one heck of a lot more Canadian flags flying in the U.S. than you’ve seen American flags in Canada. Remember, Canada has one-tenth the population of the United States. You missed my main point. Canadian cities are not Peace Arch City.
Sean: You hold nothing against Canada. Yet you, Regina, Polly, James and Robert ignored Gordon, representing the White Rock/South Surrey Chamber of Commerce, who, like I, favors flying flags of both countries in Peace Arch City.
Conclusion: David has more friends than I realized.
Richard Clark
Blaine

Early election plugs
The Editor:
For those of you who have not gone to hear one of the most prolific, knowledgeable speakers of our time, do yourself a favor and go listen to Herb Meyer, congressional candidate.
This man not only was the assistant to the director of the C.I.A. under President Reagan, but he recently returned from Afghanistan where he was brought in to advise the provisional government on security measures and help re-construct their economy, as well as just returning from Washington, D.C. where he met with the security council to advise them.
He is a constant advisor on CNN and other major news networks and has written four fabulous books on ways to fix our nation.
Everywhere he speaks he gets a standing ovation from the crowds that show up to hear him tell it like it is.
He is what Rick Larsen isn’t - the right man, for the right time.
Dave White
Blaine

The Editor:
Kelli Linville has run on the water issue for her last nine years in the legislature. Why aren’t we any closer to a solution than when she was first appointed to the House.
Is that the kind of leader we need in Olympia? All fun and games, no solutions?
Kelli Linville is talking about needing pragmatic leaders who get along with each other. I don’t elect legislators on their ability to “play well with others” any more than if they have brown hair. People are smarter than that.
If you want a future for your children, if you want a government that takes less than it gives, you can’t send Kelli Linville back to Olympia.
In the next few months she’s going to paint her opponent as “extreme” and “out of touch”. How extreme is wanting more of your money in your pocket? How out of touch is wanting your children to stay locally with a good job instead of moving to Seattle?
As taxes climb, what will be left for the young people of Whatcom County? Gene Goldsmith has a vision for the future. Can you live with the solutions of fewer taxes and a more responsible government? Goldsmith doesn’t have to resort to name-calling.
Dave & Mandy Gagnon
Blaine

Bottle bill booster
The Editor:
“Clean up after yourself” is a letter appearing in the July 25th edition from Scott McBride of Blaine. He appeals for everyone to not only clean other people’s litter but also don’t litter yourself. All well and fine as far as he is willing to go.
But, he identifies most of the litter as used beverage containers in the form of plastic and glass bottles and cans that once contained soda, beer, wine or hard liquor. McBride may recall the urging of those who proposed a bottle bill state-wide to ensure the collection and recycling of such empty containers. To view the difference that this kind of law does to cleanup the environment he need only come and visit us in British Columbia or travel south to Oregon to see the effects of such a law.
Collection rates in BC and Oregon run as high as 75 percent, while the state of Washington can do no better than the national rate of 49 percent.
Washington does a little better than the national average due to the tax on litter related materials. Proceeds of the tax pay for crews going down the main state freeways (not sideroads) cleaning up the litter.
I take the liberty to complete Scott’s last paragraph when he says, “Everyone can help make Blaine a thoroughly beautiful place to live” by supporting the National Audubon, Sierra Club and the various rod and gun clubs drive for a state bottle bill.
Joe Lotzkar,
Vancouver, BC

Letters Policy
The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank-you letters should be limited to 10 names. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please send your letter to:
225 Marine Drive, Blaine, WA 98230 or fax 360/332-2777.
E-mail:editor@thenorthernlight.com

Letters Policy

The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank you letters are limited to five individuals or groups. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please email letters to letters@thenorthernlight.com