Letters to the Editor -- February 16, 2001

Published on Fri, Feb 16, 2001
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Letters to the Editor

The Editor:
The city council seems to enjoy spending a lot of money for surveys and studies, all for the purpose of attracting tourists.

Has anyone ever asked the people who live in Blaine if they want tourists? Maybe the residents like Blaine just the way it is: quiet with no traffic or parking problems, no long lines at restaurants, fairly low taxes and few of the problems associated with tourism.

Tourism is not free. Tourists use water, overtax the already broken sewer system, require more emergency services and police presence, just to name a few expenses.

Blaine is better suited for industrial and related commercial activities. I understand that more people work in Blaine than live in Blaine. Maybe Blaine needs more affordable housing instead of more tourists.

The city of Blaine is not what I would call a tourist attraction. Every city on the coast has boats. Tourists go to places like Las Vegas, Nevada and Disneyland or Disney World.
Marvin Vandermay
Birch Bay

The Editor:
Once again the victims of crime are denied their rights as happens far too often. A trial has been “put off” for a time.

This crime was child molestation. He gets more time to show that he is really a “nice” person. He can go to work, church, be active in his community. This was what he was doing while he was molesting children. He can go on and say “poor me, how embarrassing it is for me.” We should be sorry for him? It was his actions that brought about this affair. He is the bad guy. The rest are victims.

How about the victims? Little girls who must take sleeping pills to sleep at night. Little girls who must spend time with counselors to get their lives back in order. The parents of girls who have seen their children lose childhood innocence. A wife who has lost a husband, friend, money support and two stepchildren she loves. The molester’s friends and community who must feel uncertain and uncomfortable.

Why the trial delay? A crime of this sort is one where many victims are supposed to have an attitude of “don’t talk, don’t tell.” Often they are made to feel guilty. Much of the time victims run and leave the molester to go on with his sick actions.

This molester hopes everything will “blow away” and life will go on as before. However, this is a case where the victims will not run. They will continue to live in the community and be active, even if the molester feels uncomfortable. They will try to protect other children in the community from the sick actions of this and other molesters.

Child molesters are very good at manipulations of all people involved – children, parents, friends and the community. Don’t be manipulated. Remember the real victims. They are not the molesters.
Merlyn R. Lockwood
Ferndale

The Editor:
Much of the nation is shivering as temperatures plummet and snow piles up. Those of us who don’t live in Maui are cranking up the heat and layering our polar fleece. We all must also pay particular attention to the animals, both in our homes and backyards, who are struggling to stay warm and fed.

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) offers these simple tips to help animals stay comfortable and ensure their survival during the harsh winter:

• Check your local hardware/garden store for an inexpensive heating element to use in your birdbath to ensure that robins can keep bobbin’ in their familiar watering hole.

• Clean up any anti-freeze spills. Anti-freeze tempts animals with its sweet smell and taste – but even just a small taste is a lethal dose for Fido.

• You and Poochie have been romping on snowy streets? Soak his pads in warm, soapy water to prevent irritation from salt.

• Store any wood piles out of your puppy’s reach. Young dogs love to chew but don’t realize that chunks of splintered wood don’t digest well. Same goes for Valentine’s Day chocolate – sure, dogs go bonkers for sweets but chocolate can kill them. Even dogs who have eaten chocolate in the past without any obvious signs of poisoning are in danger – every bite brings Barney one step closer to a trip to the emergency vet.

• Don’t isolate your companion animals outdoors. It’s always cruel to force social dogs and cats to stay outside solo but even more so in the cold winter months. It’s killing them – literally – to be left alone in freezing temperatures while the rest of their ‘pack’ (you and the family) are inside where it’s warm.

• If your neighbor refuses to provide his dog with the basics, file a report with your local animal control department. The law requires that outdoor dogs have access to clean, dry shelter and fresh food and water.

• Your toasty home can be awfully tempting to mice. Plug up small holes in your home with steel wool to keep any uninvited guests from crashing at your place during the winter.

Follow these simple tips and you’ll make life easier for the animals. For more information, contact PETA, 501 Front St., Norfolk, VA 23510.
Karin Bennett
Norfolk, VA

The Editor:
A heartfelt note of thanks to all of the businesses and individuals who donated goods and services to Arts & Jazz Saturday, February 3 and to those who made the contributions count by their generous bids.

The evening presented by the Blaine Fine Arts Association was a huge success, raising over $5,200 as we celebrated an evening of fun, jazz and community support for our young artists.

A special thanks to the Arts & Jazz committee: Bev Clarke, Christy Cockle, Sheila Connors, Silva Gore, Linda & Bob Gudmundson, Nancy Hamburg, Wendy Kenoyer, Allie Ryser and Leslee Smith. Your incredible efforts are greatly appreciated. Thanks also to Dean Hamburg and Randy King for adding their professional touches to the evening. Randy is really a great show.

And finally, thank you Blaine high school students, you did yourselves proud. Thanks for sharing your talents and efforts yet again with this community.
Bob and Dorita Gray
Ferndale

Letters Policy
The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank-you letters should be limited to 10 names. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please send your letter to:
225 Marine Drive, Blaine, WA 98230 or fax 360/332-2777.
E-mail:editor@thenorthernlight.com

Letters Policy

The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank you letters are limited to five individuals or groups. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please email letters to letters@thenorthernlight.com